Deloitte 9th March 2014

March 11, 2014  |  By Johnny Mooney  |  Views: 165

More from this author

View flip book

The Sunday Business Post September 21, 2014 Property 2 Property L ast week, auction giant Allsop Space lled the RDS in Dublin with ready buyers and inves- tors as it staged its 17th – and most successul – property auction since venturing into the mar- ketplace in 2011. I have always valued these auctions, as they were the rst o their kind to oer a high enough volume that they could be used as a snapshot o a signi- icant portion o the market. From 2011 to 2013, cash transactions accounted or almost 60 per cent o all transactions taking place in Ireland. At that time, investor activity in the auction room was a relatively accurate barometer o what was happening outside the auction room. In act, the auction was generally ahead o the curve and the results could have been viewed credibly as orecast indicators. With mortgaged transactions over - taking cash transactions by two to one yet again, investors are no longer dic- tating the market. You would be or- given or thinking that this should be a good thing, but in reality it is not. Investors generally have a better grounding in value, and will walk away rom a transaction beore overpaying to any large extent. With mortgaged homebuyers at the helm, it is dicult to see how stability in terms o market value can be achieved, as these buyers tend to overpay as a matter o course. At last week’s auction, homebuyers, seasoned investors and amateur in - vestors hoping to scoop an 11th-hour bargain all collided. Te result was property price chaos. Tere is usually a trend that is apparent in any auction room on the day. On some occasions, especially in the early Allsop Space days, rural homes and industrial prop - erty tended to lag behind as investors focked to newly-built apartments or well-located retail and oce oppor- tunities. Last year, industrial property took a huge leap orward, with top prices being achieved at auction rather than by private treaty. By ar the most dicult class o buy- er to entice into the auction process was the homebuyer. Tis buyer was slow to accept auctions as a method o purchase, slow to recognise the op- portunity or a bargain, and slow to put pressure on lenders to support them buying at auction. For many, the risks and uncertainty were simply insur- mountable. Te ew who participated over the last ew years did very well, usually much better than they might have ared through private treaty ne- gotiations with competition rom other buyers. I am not sure i that was the trend at last week’s auction, though. Low-val - ue rural homes almost all doubled (and some even tripled) in price rom their guide prices to the winning bids. Surprisingly, a ne period house which was well located in Ranelagh, one o Dublin’s most sought-ater areas or amily homes, ailed to attract any bids. Also surprising was the lack o in- terest in a Dublin 2 apartment guiding less than €200,000. Any other day, both o these properties would have attracted intense bidding and sold or well over the reserve prices. As I men - tioned earlier, the trends at auction are generally apparent and this one was quite pronounced. aking out the big buyers and in- stitutional investors, the majority o buyers in the room by the aternoon’s bidding had less than €150,000 to spend, I would suggest that many had well under the €100,000 mark. Tis translated into some quality properties not being sold, while ques - tionable units in equally questionable areas attracted multiple bidders and achieved prices well in excess o the reserve prices. In act, many o these properties achieved much greater prices in the auction room than they would have at private treaty. For example, one par - tially completed amily home in the midlands sold or more than twice the price o comparable houses currently available in that area. So what was driving this sudden rush o low-value buyers and inves - tors? Certainly, the market recovery is established, condence has been restored – however justied or mis - placed that might be – and bargains are genuinely starting to run out. But while all o these actors con- tribute, they are not the primary driv- ing orce. Te act is that any properties purchased as an investment beore the end o this year and held or a period o no less than seven years will attract capital gains tax (CG) relie that is currently 33 per cent. Simply put, investors who stay the course will save €33,000 per €100,000 prot. I the market recovery contin - ues, that is a huge saving. By doing this, investors are eectively gambling on the recovery continuing or the next seven years, so much so that they are grossly overpaying in today’s market. Minister or Finance Michael Noonan has already stated earlier this year that he will not be renewing the CG relie, which has been in place since 2011. His reasoning or this was the “wall o money” available rom willing inves - tors in the Irish market. O course, that was a ew months ago, and a ew months is a long time in politics, and in this surging property market too, it would appear. Howev - er, a urther extension in Budget 2015 seems unlikely at this stage. Ever the entrepreneur, Allsop Space has capitalised on this market by ar - ranging a urther auction next month, on October 22. Tis will allow buyers who wish to avail o the CG relie one nal opportunity to do so, in time to close beore the end o the year. As contracts or properties pur - chased at auction have a strict 28-day closing period, the transactions rom next month’s auction should be com - pleted beore December 31 – just don’t orget to check the price register to ascertain genuine market value beore bidding. Pay now, cash in later – but is it worth it? Carol Tallon Talking Property Some homebuyers are overpaying today to avoid capital gains tax in seven years’ time. Is this a gamble too ar? Investors are efectively gambling on the recovery continuing or the next seven years an ideal, comortable ami- ly room. Double doors lead rom here to one o the two conservatories. Tis Amdega conservatory has a tiled lime- stone foor and spot lighting and the double doors that lead to the garden allow or plen- ty o natural light to food the room, creating a sun trap. Te bright kitchen/break- ast room has ceiling coving and spot lighting and is oered a sleek nish thanks to the tted wall and foor units and dark polished granite work- tops. It is also tted with a sink, oven, grill and hob and an intercom to the gate. Be- hind the kitchen there is a ‘back kitchen’ which is ully tiled and is tted to include a larder with plenty o stor- age, a laundry area plumbed or a washing machine and a door to the rear garden. Tere is also a hot press with addi - tional storage space and a wet room complete with a WC, wash hand basin and shower. he oice eatures oak foors with ceiling coving and a sash window overlooking the courtyard. A door rom here leads to the sitting room which eatures double sash windows, a carpeted foor and a marble replace with an open re insert. Te rst bedroom has dual access and is a double room with carpeted foors, tted wardrobes and a large sash window overlooking the courtyard. A library room, with oak foors, tted bookcases and double doors leads to the sec- ond conservatory which, in turn, leads to the garden. Te inner hallway com- prises a eature arch and tiled foors and leads to the bathroom and additional bedrooms. Te bathroom has travertine stone foor and wall tiling, a bath with a shower attachment, a WC and a wash hand basin. Te luxurious master bed- room is a large room with oak foors and spot lighting, large tted wardrobes and two sash windows that overlook the courtyard. Te third and ourth bed- rooms are single rooms with oak foors and sash windows while the two remaining bed- rooms are doubles. Completing the accommo- dation is the second bathroom which comprises a bath with shower attachment, WC, wash hand basin, heated towel rail and a Velux window. A second hot press oers shelving with plenty o storage space. he sunny ront walled courtyard is gravelled and enjoys a mature, specimen cloud tree. Te rear walled classic garden includes a terrace leading rom the two conservatories to a water ea- ture and a decked area o the kitchen. Te garden is lawned with slight eature gradients, box hedging, a variety o trees, shrubs and plants. Providence goes to auction on Wednesday, October 1 at 3pm at Ganly Walters oces in Dublin. For more inor- mation contact the agent at 01-6623255. rom page 1 Sash windows illuminate the living-room A library with ftted bookshelves leads into a bright conservatory Diarmuid Gavin, Philippa Buckley and Denise O’Connor prepare or the Design Fair Picture: Peter Houlihan By ina-Marie O’neill Som o th cout’s bstkow  chtcts d dsgs w b o hd to dvs vstos bout utu d tos t th u autum Dsg F t Bco South Qut (BSQ) o Stud. Ts ’s  s ttd ‘3D Dsg Cocpts’ d tus th w kow dsgs d V psts. Duc Stwt w spk bout chtctu d sustb g pg; Dmud Gv w ocus o xto pg d dsg; d om Dsg Docto Ds O’Co  o w dscuss chtctu d t os. T spks w om  p dscusso whch w b chd b to dsg Phpp Buck o Studo 44 Dsg. Showcsg th utum coc tos  tto utu  ts Bo Cocpt, Cgs, Kub, roch Bobos d Sou lst,  o whch  bsd t BSQ. “ech  w hv xpts  th s o chtctu d to d  sg povdg dvc d sght o th tst tds. Ts ’s  w b o ptcu tst to o who s cosdg  ovto, toft o dsg o th hom d s  b  t oppotut to gt  dvc om xpt possos,” sd B rochod o Bo Cocpt. T vt omt w b  p dscusso oowd b Q&a sssos. wo p sssos w tk pc t 1.30pm d 3.30pm. Fo uth o mto, og o to bcosouthqut. . Georgian elegance in Rathmichael All the fair o the air this autumn Design event at Beacon South Quarter managing your property the headache out We take of Tak to o o ou xcd tt at to fd out mo Dubl C C Mandy Meredith : 01 246 1177 : mmeredith@sfettings.ie Dubl C C Joanne OSivan : 01 246 1177 : josivan@sfettings.ie Dubl SOuH Sarah bter : 01 278 4282 : ster@sfettings.ie Dubl OH Aoie Mahon : 01 857 3788 : amahon@sfettings.ie Dubl SOuH Aoie Ganey : 01 492 9851 : aganey@sfettings.ie Dubl SOuH wS vonne Kenny : 01 495 3001 : inosd@sfettings.com There’s leTTing prperTy - n There’s leTTing prperTies The sherryiTz wy Property Loans Negative Equity Do you have property related loans with Irish and International Banks in negative equity? Does the bank want you to make a ull and fnal settlement? Do you want to sell the property and take advantage o the debt write down? We have the unds, track record and property team to buy your assets or loans and let you avail o debt write-downs Contact : Alf Quirke 01-6629014 aq@qea.ie

Published: September 19, 2014
Views: 7
View flip book
Published: September 19, 2014
Views: 10
View flip book

The Sunday Business Post September 14, 2014 Property 2 Property S outh Korean archi- tect Minsuk Cho, in Dublin to speak at the Irish Archi - tecture Foundation and Arup's NewN - owNext lecture se- ries, is posing or photos beside a bronze statue o a horse in the gardens o the Merrion Hotel in Dublin. I muse that it should have been a lion in honour o his Golden Lion award or curating Korea's exhibi- tion entry 'Crow's eye view: the Korean peninsula' at this year's Venice Biennale. “No, I was born in the Chinese year o the horse,” he says. “Tis year is the year o the ‘blue horse’, which signies either great things or a total uck-up.” Te ormer, then, as 2014 has been an unques- tionable success or Cho. “Venice was a unique opportu- nity or me,” he says. “Te theme was not initiated by me. ypically, national pavilions come up with their own theme and present it in the best way they can by dealing with their identity through archi- tecture. Tis year, the director Rem Koolhaas decided to coordinate the entire theme under the title ‘Absorbing modernity rom 1914 to 2014’, so each country had to come with their own unique narrative about the modernity process and present it in their own indigenous, vernacular style.” A multiple architectural award winner, Cho was born in Seoul and graduated rom the Architectural Engineering Department o the city's Yonsei University beore studying at Columbia University in New York, where he started his career. He later moved to the Nether- lands and the Oce o Metropol- itan Architecture, OMA, beore es- tablishing Cho Slade Architecture in 1998 with partner James Slade in New York City. He returned to Korea in 2003 to open his own practice, Mass Studies. “Te old Seoul was a planned city, a kingdom built within our mountains about 620 years ago during the Joseon Dynasty and ounded on the principles o pung- su, or eng shui,” he explains. “When I was a kid, Korea was a Tird World country. Te South was poorer than the North until the mid-1970s, when we experi- enced this compressed economic growth, a ast, double-digit eco- nomic sprint that resulted in mas - sive urbanisation and the creation o huge skyscrapers and apartment towers.” According to Cho, ater a warp- speed race to drag itsel into the 21st century with western, Amer- ican-inuenced high-rise archi- tecture and car-centric, industri- alised urbanisation, Seoul is now maturing, becoming more reec- tive and introspective, experienc- ing a period o ‘soul-searching’, i you will. “When I came back in 2003 ater 14 years abroad, I ound a diferent country to the one I let. It took me about two years to adjust. Re- reshingly, South Korea has become quite creative. It has a huge pop culture, lots o contemporary art and movies that we can identi- y with. A political openness and democratic movement somehow created that creative explosion,” he says. Cho's Mass Studies employs about 25 people. It works on ev- erything rom small, short-term projects ranging rom a week and six-month exhibitions such as the Korean pavilion or the 2010 Shanghai Expo, to long-term ven- tures which, says Cho, typiy what he initially set out to do as an ar- chitect by creating something that will last longer than himsel. Te Pixel house is one o those, a quirky 84 square metre stacked and staggered brick home located in a creative residential scheme about an hour away rom Seoul. Designed in collaboration with his New York partner Slade in 2001, Cho regards the unusual house as his avourite and possibly biggest challenge to date. “It was designed or a creative couple and their two children who wanted to live in a unique and diferent environment, un- like about 60 per cent o the rest o the population, which wanted homogeneous, cookie-cutter style apartments.” Te residence is a radical de- parture rom the norm, and while Cho doesn’t like the limelight, it’s precisely this departure rom con- ormity that appeals to him and draws attention to his talent. DaumSpace1, a phenomenal structure created by Cho’s Mass Studies or Korea's Google equiv- alent, is another example. “Tis company is also a little rad- ical,” he says. “A successul dotcom company, it abandoned Seoul to move to a remote island of the Korean Peninsula in an efort to create a new architectural space that would tell the world how this company wants to work and live.” So what's next or Cho? “I'm not on a mission to take over the world,” he says. “I'm very happy where I am. My lie is 95 per cent about building nice buildings, but the cultural theme behind our entry at Venice has inspired the start o a dream about building some sort o engagement between North and South Korea. “I’m also putting on my rst big show in 12 years, called Be- ore And Ater, looking at buildings that we’ve designed and how they have been used, or sabotaged, or beautiully decayed since. Build- ings are like babies: you give them lie, but they make their own way. “We [Mass Studies] want to show what we intended the buildings or and what has happened to them. We’ll also be showing archived projects that didn't go ahead. I’m excited to have this opportunity to be more intelligent about what we have been doing, and how that will inorm us in the uture.” Mass Studies and massive ambition for Korean visionary rom page 1 Te iconic architecture o W Hotel and Residencies is by Gwathmey Siegel Kauman & Associates, designed by the late Charles Gwathmey who, with a group o architects known as the New York Five, rewrote the book on contem- porary liestyle. Te 228 apartments ofer the last word in luxury liv- ing, with the bonus o un- restricted access to all hotel services. Living rooms have immense picture widows with unparalleled views over the city, kitchens and bathrooms are state o the art. Tere’s a residents-only entrance and lobby with a 24-7 concierge. Amenities include a digital entertainment lounge, caé, tness centre, spa treatment rooms, and that’s not orget- ting that glorious 57th oor outdoor roo terrace. Prices start at $1.35 mil- lion to $1.785 million or a one-bedroom home (rom 56 to 74 square metres), rom $2.535 million to $3.072 million or a two-bed home (ranging rom 95 to 109 square metres), and Te Penthouse Collection, which costs rom $2.23 million to $4.875 mil- lion. A block south o the W, a second residential option is 50 West Street, a 64-storey condominium due or com- pletion in 2016. Designed by Helmut Jahn, the 191 apart- ments range rom one to ve bedrooms with double-height living rooms as standard, plus ve duplexes. With curved glass oor-to- ceiling windows, white oak loors, marble bathrooms and brushed granite kitchen countertops, these are homes or international sophisticates. Tere will also be 15 units o oce space ofered to res- idents who like to keep home and business under one roo – nine are already sold. Four oors are devoted to state-o- the-art amenities: a tness centre, a water club, a dog parlour (in bad weather, no one wants muddy paws soil- ing the oors), an observatory equipped with binocular tow- er viewers, children’s ameni- ties, and a spectacular 64th oor outdoor space that has everything needed or outdoor entertaining whether it be a barbecue or a banquet table. Fity West Street prices are rom $1.6 million to $3.2 million or a one-bed home (108.4 to 117 square metres), rom $2.49 million to $4.4 million or a two-bed home (140.5 to 161 square metres), rom $4.24 million to $7.22 million or a three-bed home (spanning between approxi- mately 214 to 223 square me- tres), and rom $6.815 million to $7.22 million or a our-bed home o 248 square metres. Te L Series penthouses cost $18.63 million or 340 square metres. Te emphasis on outdoor and children’s acilities signals the new trend o Downtown as a amily location – Lower Manhattan is now the astest growing school zone in the city. On the southern tip o Man- hattan island, Battery Park has endless bike lanes, 36 acres o parks, gardens, playing elds and playgrounds and the Manhattan Sailing School is right on its doorstep. Te changes across Lower Manhattan would have been unimaginable back in 1990, when anywhere south o 44th Street was a walk on the wild side. As one Manhattan prop- erty watcher put it: “Tere are no bad districts in Manhattan anymore – you see people us- ing their iPads on the subway.” Even the edgiest districts have come into the old. At 30th street you can climb the stairs to the High Line and stroll through a 1. 6-kilometre linear park all the way south to three blocks below West 14th Street. A section o the elevat- ed ormer New York Central Railroad has been redesigned and planted as an aerial gre- enway – the vegetation cho- sen to pay homage to the wild plants that had colonised the abandoned railway. Te once seedy West 14th Street is now home to top re- tailers such as DKNY and the Apple Store. Downtown innovations aren’t restricted to multimil- lion dollar ventures. Te latest change to the skyline is the Water ank Project whereby, one tank at a time, the amil- iar eyesores are now being wrapped in artwork, intended to utilise art as social inspira- tion – and draw attention to the most precious resource o the 21st century. For more details of W New York Downtown Hotel and Residencies, and 50 West Street, see JP Knight & Partners at jpknightandpartners.com, call 0044-2073366777, or e-mail sales@jpknightandpartners.com Downtown goes uptown in New York 50 West bedrooms look out over the Hudson river The luxury W Hotel and Residences development was led by Dubliner Philip Hegarty or JP Knight & Partners, a London asset management frm High Line park: a stretch o abandoned railway turned into a greenway Dogs wait or their owners to return at a hitching post outside a Starbucks in New York A living room in the W Hotel and Residencies in downtown New York One World Trade Center rises north o the W Hotel A living-room in the 50 West condo development Minsuk Cho: ‘I’m not on a mission to take over the world’ Picure: Maura Hickey Arriving in Dublin for a lecture tour, award-winning architect Minsuk Cho talks Korean history, modernity and letting his buildings go, writes Tina-Marie O’Neill For Someone with Taste Cottage on 7 Acres Overlooking the River Lennon near Rathmelton Co. Donegal. €360,000 Replys to 087/2343364

Published: September 12, 2014
Views: 75
View flip book

BILL KENWRIGHT PRESENTS THEIR LIVES WERE WORLDS APART... ...THEIR DESTINY JOINED THEM TOGETHER THE MUSICAL FOR ALL TIME COMES TO DUBLIN FOR TWO WEEKS ONLY! MONDAY 29 SEPTEMBER - SATURDAY 11 OCTOBER 0818 719 377 WWW.BORDGAISENERGYTHEATRE.IE Telephone & Internet bookings subject to € 1.50 s/c per ticket upto € 12; 12.5% over € 12 (max € 5.95) / Agents € 2.00

Published: September 12, 2014
Views: 14
View flip book
Published: September 9, 2014
Views: 28
View flip book

BILL KENWRIGHT PRESENTS THEIR LIVES WERE WORLDS APART... ...THEIR DESTINY JOINED THEM TOGETHER THE MUSICAL FOR ALL TIME COMES TO DUBLIN FOR TWO WEEKS ONLY! MONDAY 29 SEPTEMBER - SATURDAY 11 OCTOBER 0818 719 377 WWW.BORDGAISENERGYTHEATRE.IE Telephone & Internet bookings subject to € 1.50 s/c per ticket upto € 12; 12.5% over € 12 (max € 5.95) / Agents € 2.00

Published: September 5, 2014
Views: 41
View flip book

The Sunday Business Post September 7, 2014 Property 2 Property O ver the last year or so, the propor- tion o cash buyers in the Irish mar- ketplace peaked at 57 per cent. Tis was, relatively speaking, the highest level o cash-only transactions in decades and was not entirely unex- pected given the scale o the global credit crunch. However, the mortgage market has now moved on, and it was recently conrmed that mortgaged buyers, principally home-buyers, accounted or two-thirds o all residential transactions or the second quarter o the year. Almost 30 per cent o these home-buyers are peo- ple trading-up. Tis is genuinely good news or a number o reasons, not least because it is the strongest indication so ar that the current generation o young homeowners are nally combating the blight o negative equity. It also has a positive trickle-down eect or rst-time buyers, as it releases so-called starter home stock back into the market. At a time when price hikes are driven almost exclusively by chronic shortage, any new stock is to be welcomed. It is hoped that even a small increase in the number o second-hand houses will slow down the disproportionate price rises seen over the past ew years, particularly in the Dublin market. While property values have increased hugely in re - cent years, the rises are compounded by a premium levy; that is to say, buyers are paying market value plus a bit extra to secure the ew remaining amily home type properties in many areas. Te danger with this type o pricing is that when new stock becomes available, which will reasonably take rom two to ve years, the older homes will not be able to sustain the premium paid, thus repeating the cycle o negative equity that has paralysed the residential market since the crash. Tere is little that government policy can do to speed up the supply o new homes within the next two years, so it is encouraging to see the trading-up portion o the market increase, as it is the most eective stimulus at this time. So what does this news mean or house-hunters? Es - sentially, it means that there will be a marginal increase in housing suitable or rst-time buyers and the mort- gage lending to back it up – which is equally important. It also means that or anyone currently looking or their rst home, there will be a ew more options to choose rom, but not many. It will not cause prices to drop. At best, it will hopeully slow down the rate o in- crease in key desirable areas. It is not a signicant enough boost to encourage would-be buyers on the sidelines back into the game. For many, the most sen- sible decision is to wait or a period o two to ve years or more housing stock to be delivered and then pay the market value or that property, rather than absorbing the additional scarcity premium today that might not stack up within a ew short years. For potential buyers in a position to take their time, the recent mortgage news does not change anything, but it will oer some encouragement to house-hunters who are still trying to secure their new home in 2014. For would-be buyers who are determined to buy as soon as possible, the ocus initially should be on re - search, as there is a huge level o new supply planned in hal o the counties across Ireland. A quick search with your local planning oce today will reveal the likely picture o the market in that area over the next ve years. Tis inormation is publicly available, and its im- portance or buyers and sellers cannot be over-estimat- ed. Most media commentary speaks in general terms and on a nationwide or regional basis – it has to – but this inormation in itsel is not sucient or buyers to rely on. Such market analysis is a helpul starting point, but there is no substitute or local legwork when con - sidering such a huge nancial move. Te internet has changed how we approach house-hunting, giving us access to veried price data and most properties available. But it has also overloaded us with irrelevant inormation, and has stopped buy - ers asking questions to the right people. I you want to know the history o a property, when the area last ood- ed, how trac management works in busy times, how the youth culture locally aects residents, how respon- sive local authorities are or any other important issues, then local residents are the people to speak to. Chances are, i you have been looking or your dream home or a while, you will already know everything that the internet has to oer – and you are still looking. I be - lieve it was Albert Einstein who dened insanity as do- ing the same thing over again and expecting a dierent result. Do yoursel a avour: take the search o-line or a while, visit the area, chat to locals and see how your search evolves. Follow Carol Tallon on Twitter, @CarolTallon Beginning to nd the positive in the negative Carol Tallon Talking Property Te news that 30 per cent o buyers are those trading up is great – releasing houses into a market short o stock and proo that some have begun to ght the blight o negative equity By Tina-Marie O’neill L ocated closer to Cab- inteely village than Foxrock village, this our-bedroom resi - dence on Brennan- stown Road should draw plen- ty o attention rom amilies looking or a spacious home in this afuent and well-estab- lished South Dublin suburb. Despite its winding, coun- try-road-like location and the rustic eel o the grounds, which extend to 1.06 acres, Navarone is close to the Luas, the N11 and its QBC, Cor- nelscourt Shopping Centre, Cabinteely Park, a range o good schools and addition- al shopping acilities within a short drive at Blackrock, Dun Laoghaire, Stillorgan and Dundrum. Te house is laid out in a traditional style with three generous reception rooms, a large kitchen/breakast room at the rear, a utility room and our double bedrooms, two o which enjoy en suites, while the master also incorporates a dressing room. A smart, period style ront door with ull-height win- dows on either side is shel- tered beneath a colonnad- ed portico that leads to an enclosed porch with cream carpets. A second door with rosted glass panels – and ull-height rosted glass windows on ei- ther side – opens to an un- expectedly large, L-shaped reception hall with coved ceilings, recessed lights and quality grey patterned carpets. Immediately to the let is a guest WC with white sanitary ware and a large window to the ront. Te drawing room is on the right and enjoys dual aspect views o the ront and side gardens through large pic- ture windows. A tasteully decorated room, it has cream carpets and walls, coving and a large white marble replace and hearth. Te amily room next door is similarly decorated and has large picture windows over- looking the garden. Te re- place in this room has a timber surround and marble inset. Te ormal dining room across the hall is well-pro- portioned and has pale grey carpets, striped bottle-green wallpaper, ceiling coving and a picture window overlooking the side gardens. he open-plan kitchen/ breakast/lounge area spans the length o the house at the rear. Te kitchen has an extensive range o cream Shaker-style base and wall-mounted units with wooden knobs, solid Beech countertops and a range o integrated appliances and a breakast bar. Te oors are solid timber and the splashback tiles are white with a small blue mo- ti. Tere is ample space or a amily kitchen table as well as a lounge area at the oppo- site end o the room in ront o large sliding doors opening to the rear patio garden. An adjoining utility room is plumbed or a washing machine and dryer and has a door leading to the side o the house. Upstairs, a bright land- ing has a walk-in hot press, amily bathroom and our well-appointed bedrooms, two o which are en suite. he expansive master bedroom at the ront has sand-coloured carpets and an extensive range o built- in wardrobes. It also has a dressing room with itted rails and drawers as well as a large en suite with a white suite, including a bath, a sep- arate step-in shower, a basin set into a vanity unit with good storage, sand-coloured carpets and ully tiled walls incorporating tted mirrors. A second large double bed- room at the ront used to be two bedrooms and is equal- ly tasteul in its decor. Tere are another two large double bedrooms at the rear with luxurious carpets and built- in wardrobes. One has an en suite shower room. Te main bathroom has a white suite, including a bath and shower. Te garage at the ront has internal access through the entrance hall by the staircase. Outside, a sweeping tarmac driveway meanders through the well-manicured lawns surrounded by mature trees and shrubbery. Te ront o the property has parking or multiple cars while pathways lead to the rear, large patio garden and rolling lawns beyond. o nd out more, or to ar- range a viewing, contact the agent’s Dun Laoghaire branch at 01-2844422. Spacious our-bed in afuent Foxrock or €1.75 million NavaroNe, BreNNaNstowN road, Foxrock, duBliN 18 P: €1.75 million sz: 277 square metres F : a Foxrock our- bed with a colonial-style acade set on more than an acre Ber: D2 agn : Sherry FitzGerald th pn-pn hn  p Nn, Bnnnn r, F, dbn 18th ng-m  fy  fm pg 1 eight amily townhouses on Newtownpark Avenue in Blackrock, launched to market last weekend priced rom €665,000. One house remained or sale last Friday. “Te show house was open rom 11.30am to 1.30pm, and we had about 100 parties through, including young amilies and mature rst time buyers. Te seven terraced houses all sold, while the detached house at €775,000 is still available,” said Rena O'Kelly, director o residential at Knight Frank, the agents handling the launch. Te same agent, togeth- er with Citywide Auction- eers, is launching 13 two and three-bedroom apartments rom the President's Court, a block o 29 units at Fawn Lodge in Castleknock, Dub- lin 15 and which are open or viewing on Wednesdays rom 5pm to 6pm and Saturdays rom 3pm to 5pm. Prices or the two-bed units at the Fi - ancon Builders scheme start rom €299,950 and three-bed units rom €380,000. Parkedge, another new- ly-launched Gannon scheme o three-bedroom homes in Clongrin in Dublin 13, is also being sold by Knight Frank and is open or viewing today rom 3pm to 5pm. Prices start rom €270,000 or three-sto- rey, three-bedroom terraced units and buyer interest is high. Other agents with new schemes about to hit the market include Douglas Newman Good, which will be launching 14 new two, three and our-bedroom houses at Maxwell Square on Maxwell Road in Rathmines at the end o this month. Te units are expected to sell quickly as in- terest in those is already high, according to Gemma Lanigan, a partner at DNG New Homes. “Buyers now are really sav- vy compared to six or seven years ago, and they're coming with mortgage approval, or as cash buyers who may have rented during the boom and now have the unds to buy. We have three large our-bedroom houses launching soon at Phoenix Mews, an inll site in Castleknock and new homes coming on in Ratharnham, Beechpark in Leixlip, in al- laght and in Drumcondra over the next ew weeks and months,” said Lanigan. “Developers that survived the crash and are re-emerg- ing are taking baby steps. Where once they would have launched schemes o 250 and 300 homes, they're now bringing small developments o 10, 20, 60 to the market,” she said. Also in north Dublin, Savills is bringing new ve-bedroom amily homes to the market later this month at Castle- moyne in Balgrin, Dub- lin 13. Te 181 square metre semi-detached units are be- ing built by Shannon Homes where prices will start rom about €510,000. Te same agent is bring- ing almost 40 houses to the market in October at Coopers Wood in Kinsealy, which Ruth Canning at Savills New Homes division says has attracted much interest. Te A-rated homes include three-bedroom semis o 112 to 122 square metres and de- tached our-bedroom houses o 142 to 154 square metres. Prices or these have yet to be set. O the 27 our and ve-bed- room Ballymore Develop- ments houses launched in May in erenure, only one ve bed remains or sale, accord- ing to Canning, and ve more will be completed and brought to market next month. Savills has all ve houses coming to market at the small Ludord Grove scheme o the Ballinteer Road in Dundrum, as well as ve more or sale later this week at Glencairn, a hugely successul Park De- velopments scheme in Leop- ardstown. New homes bubble to the surface th nng-m  -ppn a ng-m n, b,  nng-m n n f h Pg hm a ng-m  h Pn' c pmn n Fn lg, cn th ng-m h g p n th p  h  g gn

Published: September 5, 2014
Views: 39
View flip book

KeepItSafe® DR provides businesses an all-in-one online backup and disaster recovery solution to recover business servers - get you up and running in minutes. Continuous snapshots of entire server De-duplication and compression for 5x reduction in storage needs Integrated modules for Exchange and SQL Perfect for remote oces or cloud-based backup strategies Full, secure osite replication Bare-metal recovery for critical volumes Manage entire environments from a single pane of glass Flexible retention policies Exception for alerting to Windows event log or email TOTAL RECOVERABILITY. 100% GUARANTEED. THE BUSINESS CONTINUITY SOLUTION YOU CAN’T AFFORD TO BE WITHOUT CALL FOR YOUR DEMO! CALL FOR YOUR DEMO! 1890 222 587 www.keepitsafe.ie CONTINUOUS SERVER BACKUP FAST DISASTER RECOVERY EASY CENTRALIZED MANAGEMENT 1 02/09/2014 16:23

Published: September 2, 2014
Views: 195
Page 1 / 7